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4th Women’s REI Network Meet up: Sage Mountain Center

August 8th Meet-Up Update:

We carpooled up to Sage Mountain Center from Butte to meet-up August 8th. Sage Mountain Center is located between Butte and Whitehall off Highway 2. While Linda Welsh welcomed her Airbnb guests (https://www.airbnb.com/rooms/4948880), we settled into the main dining hall with foods she had prepared. If you, your friends and family visiting the Butte area want a peaceful and beautiful get away book through the link above at Sage Mountain. Thanks Linda!

This month the subject was contractor negotiations. All involved in the meeting had stories to share. Investors roll their eyes when you mention contractors and I notice my contractor friends roll their eyes when you mention investors and projects…The overall conclusion regarding working with contractors is that upfront communication and win/win relationships work best. Sorry stories of what can go wrong usually boil down to miscommunication and poor business skills (on both sides of the contract).  So, in an effort to not disclose member experiences but send you to a similar discussion, here is a link to a good discussion in Bigger Pockets on this very issue.  This discussion addresses how a contractor makes money, what is negotiable and what is not: https://www.biggerpockets.com/forums/67/topics/429682-negotiating-with-gc-bids

During the August meet up, we also discussed dream projects in uptown Butte. These projects would require combined investments, creative financing and great rehab contractor skills. Cari Cox, investor and realtor has offered to set up tours of mentioned dream projects! She is hostess of the next meet-up and will take us through the Salvation Army building.

When dreaming, it is wise to talk about what motivates an investor. We talked about the “why” of real estate investing and for that matter, any of your interests. Each member shared a little of what motivates them to invest in real estate. There are goals for retirement, passive income and better living, but what happens when that goal is reached or when it’s harder than you thought? Where does the motivation come from then? A common theme was doing good for our community.

So, what does Butte need?

We began outlining needs in our community for different tenant groups. Students are getting a lot of attention and new construction and rehabbed units are newly in supply. One area that is not addressed that we know of is sober living housing.

“A sober home is exactly what it sounds like. It’s a place people can go when they first come out of rehab. Somewhere to live, drug- and alcohol-free. Residents take drug tests, attend 12-step meetings and have curfews to keep them on the straight and narrow.”  from https://www.marketplace.org/2013/04/05/life/renting-homes-recovering-addicts-profit

This is a market that is bad when it’s bad and very profitable when it is good according to the above article. Experiences with pros and cons of renting to higher risk tenants without support of a sober living program were shared. General consensus was that this tenant group does better when mixed with other income and non-addict groups and poorly when concentrated into substandard living conditions with like-high risk neighbors.

Go figure…something to think about when rehabbing larger apartment buildings, perhaps plan in a couple sober living units. With so many investors concentrating on upscale units, it is wise for the long term investor to also look at this population of which there will be constant supply and need.

Next Women Real Estate Investors Network (WREIN) Monday, September 25th, 2017 6:00 to 7:30 101 E. Broadway Ave, Butte Montana.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3rd Women REI Network Meet Up: Financing Options

file (2).jpegMet at 827 W. Park, Butte Montana at the “Buttification” home featured in HGTV pilot, July 26th  6:00 to 7:30.  Thank you Kathleen for hostessing! Topic for the evening was “financing options”. The group consisted of investors experienced in financing with other people’s money including investing with: family, a contractor to decrease amount for construction loan, traditional bank loans, lines of credit, solo 401k, solicited investors for down payments. Presented basic information on difference between recourse and non-recourse loans. There was also experience in the group with buyers using owner financing and suggested terms to use when owner is elderly.

Attendees touched on the difference between self-employment income tax and passive income tax. S-corp formation suggested as a way to stratify taxation of income generated by a sole-proprietor business. Presented rationale for WREIN being set up as an S-corp.

We talked about the difficulty of “hospice” properties. Properties which have been vacant  a long time due to difficult owner relationships. Approaching the owners requires investment in patience, time and focus on win/win. 30% vacancy rate in housing stock in uptown Butte means opportunity for those skilled in difficult conversations with owners.

At each WREIN Meet Up, I ask each person for an “ask”. Asks from this group included: rehab estimation cost calculator, carport strategy solutions, how to monetize WREIN, certified historic brick repair contractors and what was the last…a request for the next group meet up! Feeling that this group is very well appreciated and will continue.

Next meet-up is: August 8th at 6 pm located at Sage Mountain Retreat: http://sagemountain.org/

Will be looking to car pool!

Address79 Sage Mountain Trail, Whitehall, MT 59759

Mom Knew Best All Along: Real Estate Paid for College in the 80’s

8 years ago, my husband and I spent lots of time adjusting our financial goals from exclusively wage-working until retirement to investing in buy and hold real estate. We felt it was a hugely fresh take on how to live our lives. Surprise! Not new. Mom already did a version of it in the 80’s.

In a Bigger Pockets podcast, Jay Hinrichs a real estate investor with 40 years experience, said there is nothing new in real estate: https://www.biggerpockets.com/renewsblog/bp-podcast-222lessons-learned-40years-real-estate-investor-jay-hinrichs.  If you look back through the decades, you find people were using the same investment strategies we use today. That truism parallels my experience in our family’s financial planning.

While sharing our brave new financial strategy with my mom, she gently pointed out that she put my brother and me through college with the profits of 2 real estate investments she made in the late 80’s. Wait, what! Mom already did what I am doing now. Why didn’t I leave her home 30 years ago with this plan for investment? Why didn’t I repeat my mom’s strategy earlier?

Instead of talking with mom about the grand-kids in our next phone call, I asked her questions about her process and motivation back in the 70’s and 80’s causing her to invest in RE. Here is the story.

First of all, mom is no slouch. She was born during WWII, lost her Dad at age 16, graduated from Michigan State, worked as a librarian, married and then divorced her high-school sweetheart after putting him through law school. As a single mom, she put herself through law school while raising 2 grade-school children. Her specialty was Estate Law, that is helpful.

Mom’s take on money is that it should be made quietly and not talked about much. I apologize to mom in advance for posting this so publicly.

Motivation to invest in real estate came from her need to fund our college tuition. She states she would have never bought investment properties if she did not have children. Children created a financial need beyond what her job could cover. Her job funded her retirement and our monthly budget but, how to fund college?

You can see from her short bio, mom knew how to plow through to her goals. The goal of getting us through college without debt weighed on her. She did not trust that Dad would be contributing to this effort, so she developed a plan she had control over. Like many female heads of households, mom realized the limitations of working more to generate more income. Luckily, as an estate lawyer, she saw the tax benefit of passive income. Two of her lawyer friends were investing in Buffalo, New York. She ran some numbers and launched her plan.

Mom started shopping with an eye for properties that would cash flow from the start and mature for sale when my brother and I needed college funds. Two properties she found met that goal. They were within driving distance of our home. Financing was available: she had the money for the down. I believe she saved the money by driving uniquely strange cars: a purple AMC Gremlin and then a Green Mercury Comet. Neither of our cars looked as good as in these photos.  Both could accommodate a canoe with tie downs through the windows on family trips. I loved these cars. But, I digress.

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For those of us interested in teaching our children the benefit of real estate investing, pay attention now. This is where I missed the lesson. My take away from mom’s real estate investing was: it meant mowing.

Yes, this writer went through college and incurred no debt through the efforts of my forward thinking mother but, my prominent memory is that mom’s REI created unpaid work. Mom managed the properties herself. Upon purchase of each investment, mom laid carpet, grouted tile and painted the units herself. She also remembers hiring contractors to help with a porch roof and appliance work. My brother and I mowed and went with her to the properties for drive-bys and clean-outs.  Mom was very good at realizing the value of delayed gratification. My brother and I were not.

How did I miss the educational opportunity that was in my face, by 20 years?  Let’s be honest, a single working mom is limited on time, so a teen  (me) who appears to hear static when presented information about financial planning may miss out. Either mom did not include us in the financial education portion of her plan or I did not understand the value of listening. She did her books after my brother and I went to bed, we mowed.

Mom realized the benefit of passive income (and some indentured labor) and met her investment goals but, handing down the financial knowledge was not part of the plan. Philosophically, mom is a champion of work as the way to stay out of trouble. We were  to go to college and then to jobs. The purpose of real estate investment in her portfolio to meet a single goal and not to be repeated for continued wealth generation. She was an estate lawyer, I wonder if she just wasn’t impressed with the trust children of her clients.

So, what will I do that will be new? It will not be some breakthrough REI strategy as I previously thought, but rather a cultural shift of financial education for my kids.  How we talk about money to our children will be the change. Economies change over time as do the effectiveness of investments strategies. Our kids will need to be financially nimble. Going forward, I resolve to involve my kids not only in my drive-bys and some paid mowing, but also the books.

We are going to Bali, Indonesia next month to visit my Dad (another story) and I will be sure to show my kids how this travel is funded through our real estate. Our jobs are funding our monthly budgets and some retirement. REI is heavily funding our fun and the larger part of our retirement.

To all the REI moms out there:

  1. Teach your kids the value of work and RE investing. They go together well.
  2. Encourage them to start early.
  3. Structure your REI in a way that generates enough time to teach your children about your business concept.
  4. Budget for a property manager. For goodness sake!
  5. Network with families doing investments.
  6. Create your own women’s real estate investment network.
  7. Pay your kids for the work they do on the family investments. Their frontal lobes are not yet fully developed to understand the consequence of money over time.
  8. Encourage your children to invest as a means to finance their dreams in career and lifestyle.
  9. Encourage your kids to teach their friends about investing.
  10. Encourage your kids to believe that increasing passive income to acheive life goals is admirable, not money grabbing.